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Stroking

 

Effect   

  •  Assists localised tissue dynamics and stimulates lymphatic responses
  • Improves localised blood circulation, tissue oxygenation and hydration.
  • Massage stimulates localised biochemical and neurophysiological responses.

 

Application    

  • Do not under estimate the value of this gentle technique, the benefits are extensive.
  • Stroking can be effective for pain relief in more sensitive or congested areas of the body.                        
  • It can be used over all parts of the body.

 

Method                  

  • Slow stroking movements are performed with as much of the Mitts possible in contact with the body part you are massaging.
  • Start with very gentle pressure then build up the pressure you are comfortable with.    
  • Your hands should be relaxed so the mitts can mould themselves smoothly over the body contours of the area begin massaged.
  • To apply deeper strokes it is not necessary to use more force, just stroke a smaller area to induce a more localised response.
  • Stroking should extend across the full length of the body part or muscle being massaged.
  • Stroking should be repeated many times and concentrated on areas that feel hard or tight until they relax.
  • It is a good technique to begin and end your massage with.
  • It is usually recommended that more pressure is applied with long upward strokes towards the heart and a lighter pressure on the return stroke.
  • The Mitt should stay in contact with the skin at all times.

 

Stroking and Effleurage is a gentle sweeping stroke using a flat hand to engage as many nodules on the mitts as possible.

Always use this movement at the beginning of your massage, to connect each movement and to finish the massage.

It has a soothing effect on the nerves, help to improve localised blood and tissue oxygenation to reduce congestion.

Effleurage

 

Effect                   

  • Mobilises connective tissue and but slightly deeper into the, muscle fibres and fascial system.
  • Assists localised tissue dynamics and stimulates lymphatic responses
  • Improves localised blood circulation, tissue oxygenation and hydration.
  •  Massage stimulates localised biochemical and neurophysiological responses.

 

Application        

  • Effleurage can be applied in multiple-directions, across and along the direction of muscle fibres, around the shape of the limb or following the cantors of the body.

 

Method      

  • It is a great technique to use between all other movements to loosen adhered fibres and scar tissue.
  • Effleurage is very similar to stroking movements but slightly more pressure is required releasing tissue congestion and move ‘blockages’ within the tissue and body systems.
  • It should not be uncomfortable but there may be some discomfort over more congested areas.
  • Effleurage is performed with as much of the Mitts possible in contact with the body part you are massaging; the more nodules that are in contact with the skin the better the results.
  • Your hands should be relaxed so the mitts can mould themselves smoothly over the body contours of the area begin massaged.
  • Start with very gentle pressure then build up the pressure you are comfortable with.    
  • You can either push the Mitts over the tissue away from your midline, or pull the Mitts towards the midline.
  • Tension/congestion in various muscle and fascial structure tend to build along movement patterns in the body, so make sure you massage to joints above and below where you have restricted movement or tension.